Does cooking make vegetables lose nutrition? ?

So the other day I started reading about vegetables and does heating them make lose the essential nutrition. ..I came across some interesting information. ..
The common method of cooking used are boiling, steaming, frying, roasting. ..

The University of Parma in Italy analyzed boiling, steaming and frying to determine the effects these methods have on phytochemical contents of carrots, zucchini and broccoli. They found steaming and boiling vegetables preserved the most antioxidants. They also found an increase in antioxidant levels in all of these cooked vegetables, concluding that cooking may actually help increase antioxidant levels. This could be due to cooking’s ability to soften the vegetables’ fibers and increase antioxidants’ availability.
Many B vitamins and vitamin C are lost or diminished through cooking vegetables in water because they leach into cooking water. Saving cooking water and using it in soup or elsewhere helps, put leached vitamins to good use. Also the longer the cooking times and the higher the heat, the more of these vitamins are lost…
Monitoring potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, zinc, manganese and copper levels, researchers found that cooking decreased mineral content by an average of 60 percent to 70 percent. Squeezing the vegetables after boiling incurred the biggest losses. Parching, frying and stewing the vegetables resulted in the fewer losses.
Some enzymes and other compounds are destroyed through cooking. For example, an enzyme called myrosinase, found in broccoli, helps rid the liver of carcinogens but is destroyed by heat. Allicin, the compound responsible for garlic and onions’ strong taste and smell, is also destroyed by cooking. Allicin can help fight bacteria and parasites, according to an article published in the scientific journal “Microbes and Infection.” But other compounds, like tomatoes’ cancer-fighting lycopene, become more available through cooking.

Raw and cooked vegetables add flavor, texture and many nutrients to your diet. While eating vegetables raw gives you an abundance of vitamins and minerals, cooking certain vegetables enhances some nutrients. The average adult needs at least four to five servings of vegetables each day.
Kale and spinach show an increase in certain nutrients when cooked, according to the USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory. Cooked kale has 2.5 grams of protein, 0.52 grams of fat and 2.6 grams of fiber.

A cup of cooked onions has 1 gram more protein than raw onions, a higher concentration of both calcium and selenium, and more choline, lutein and vitamin K than 1 cup of raw onions.
Frying vegetables reduces their nutritional value because the antioxidant properties of plants are eliminated by the oxidation caused by the deep frying process.
Canned peas and carrots lose 85 to 95 percent of their natural Vitamin C. After six months, another study showed that frozen cherries lost as much as 50 percent of anthocyanins, the nutrients found in the dark pigments of fruits and vegetables. Cooking removes about two-thirds of the vitamin C in fresh spinach.
A March 2007 study looked at the effects of boiling, steaming, microwaving and pressure cooking on the nutrients in broccoli. Steaming and boiling caused a 22 percent to 34 percent loss of vitamin C. Microwaved and pressure-cooked vegetables retained 90 percent of their vitamin C.
Roasting vegetables is a healthy way to serve them because it doesn’t require large amounts of oil or butter to do. However, cooking vegetables at very high temperatures can sometime result in nutrient loss, but doing it the right way preserves the nutrition of the vegetables without sacrificing flavor..

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